Resource Library Listing

Activities

With detail, you can train educators to implement it with fidelity, replicate it across multiple settings and measure the use of the innovation. With your team, consider a current or upcoming initiative and work through the tasks provided.
How do you start engaging in stage-based implementation activities? Review the Module 1 material on Implementation Stages then consider these questions. We encourage you to discuss these with your team and/or to write down your responses.
How could you leverage the Implementation Drivers framework in your work? Discuss these questions with your team and/or to record your responses. Thinking about a specific instructional practice or behavioral innovation may make this exercise meaningful for you.
So, how could you leverage the Implementation Teams framework in your work? Consider the following questions when creating teaming structures to support new programs and innovations. Discuss these with your team and/or to write down your responses.
Review these diagrams and consider the following questions. We encourage you to review and discuss these with your team and/or to write down your responses.
After reviewing Module 1: An Overview of Active Implementation Frameworks read the following article. Then, as an individual or with your team, respond to the questions below.
Map the levels of quality and effort being applied to Competency Drivers for a current program or innovation. This activity will help you with action planning as you zero in on Drivers that can benefit from more effort and/or attention.
Selection of staff, from an Active Implementation perspective is different from “selection as usual” in two important ways. Review the two distinctions, and then try to apply the two concepts in your setting or to your initiative.
As you are working on building coaching in your team or organization, read the following article. Then, as an individual or with your team, respond to the questions.
Integration of Implementation Drivers is a key facet of doing Active implementation. Using the Implementation Drivers diagram, map your current, then improved information/communication pathways between Drivers. Then name three ways to get there.
To what degree do you have control and responsibility over Implementation Driver resources, personnel, or processes? This activity will help you quickly assess locus of responsibility in your system.
Watch the video clip and listen for mentions of Implementation Drivers. Then, reflect on your organization and think about potential new ways of doing work using Implementation Drivers to improve fidelity and outcomes.
Using content from Module 2 and the Implementation Drivers diagram, try summarizing Implementation Drivers and their components in a few short sentences.
Jot down different EBPs/EIIs that you have experienced, participated in or led and pick one of those initiatives that has been in place the longest. Then, “drive around” the Implementation Drivers diagram and reflect on the questions provided.
Reflect on your current organization. How would you describe your system, organization or team environment? Use one of the planning tools to assess your environment, then consider plans for potential improvement.
You have decided to explore the potential of having an Implementation Team in your building, district, region or state. Looking across your organization, is there an existing team that could be repurposed? Or, do you need to start fresh?
Implementation Teams use Terms of References (ToR) to provide clarity about the work of the team, help the team stay ‘on mission’ and orient new members. Use this activity with your team to organize and articulate a ToR.
This activity encourages you to identify potential Implementation Team members and responsibilities of team types, as well as consider team support strategies.
Think about a time you were trying to use a new education skill or program. As an individual or with your team, reflect on these questions.
Before starting “something new,” it’s important to review what already exists and how your district is using existing resources. This activity can help delineate how much is already being asked of staff and determine if the “new” will fit with the “existing.”
The Hexagon Tool is designed to help states, districts, and schools systematically evaluate new and existing innovations via six broad factors: needs, fit, resource availability, evidence, readiness for replication and capacity to implement.
The Training Plan Template is designed to help guide your team’s planning process in developing a training program. This tool can be used to guide discussions around rationale, core components, knowledge, skills, outcomes and assessment.
By “linking” communication protocols, organizations form a practice-policy communication cycle. These feedback processes provide supportive policy, funding, and operational environments for new initiatives, as well as systems changes.
Using the Stages of Implementation Analysis tool, think of a current initiative at your site and consider which components of the Exploration Stage were in place, partially in place or not in place when it was first launched. How about now?
After reviewing Module 4: Implementation Stages, create a 3-minute elevator speech for district leadership, a superintendent or principal explaining the importance of purposefully move through Implementation Stages.
Review a set of 5 scenarios. For each scenario mark one of the following: A) Exploration B) Installation C) Initial Implementation D) Full Implementation E) None of these
“Readiness” is defined as a developmental point at which a person, organization, or system has the capacity and willingness to engage in a particular activity. Use this activity to explore aspects of readiness and change with your Team.
Implementation Teams use PDSA Cycles to help them make meaningful changes, alleviate barriers, and achieve expected outcomes. This activity is designed to help you understand you PDSA strengths, recognize strengths in others, and identify potential team gaps.
By “linking” communication protocols, organizations form a practice-policy communication cycle. These feedback processes provide supportive policy, funding, and operational environments for new initiatives, as well as systems changes.
Review Module 5, Topic 4: Transformation Zones. Then, create a 2‐3 minute elevator speech for leadership in your organization explaining the difference between a “pilot” and a “transformation zone”.
This case provides an example of an approach to establishing usable innovations. Review the case example, then go through the discussion questions yourself, or with your team.
Implementing a fidelity assessment often poses a number of challenges for implementation teams. In this activity we provide an initial four‐step approach for identifying, categorizing, and discussing challenges, then completing action planning.
Has your team identified the core components of your intervention or innovation? Has your team clearly defined or operationalized them? If YES, use the Fidelity Assessment Brainstorming Worksheet (included), to complete this activity individually or as a team.
The purpose of this activity is to provide you and/or your Team with the “space” to discuss and reflect on the components of the Plan‐Do‐Study‐Act Cycle (PDSA) and apply it to your work.
The ImpleMap interview process assists implementation specialists in collecting information to inform active implementation planning and development in the organization.

Cases

Evaluation and Planning Tools

This brief provides ten principles to guide development of school improvement systems.
This template provides the basis for developing a Coaching Service Delivery Plan. The Coaching Service Delivery Plan is a proactive approach to purposeful and supportive coaching.
The Coaching System Development Worksheet can be used to initiate those early discussions about the importance of coaching and the facilitative supports administrators need to consider to ensure a systemic commitment to coaching.
The DCA is an action assessment designed to help educational district leaders and staff better align resources with intended outcomes and develop action plans to support the use of effective innovations. Both the training and tool are available online.
When creating active implementation capacity in an organization, the first task is to map the current landscape. The ImpleMap interview process assists implementation specialists in collecting information to inform active implementation planning and development.
Action planning around the Implementation Drivers is a vital and ongoing responsibility of Implementation Teams. This planning tool is designed to help your teams in the action planning process.
Implementation Drivers are the key components of capacity and the infrastructure supports that enable a program’s success. This assessment tool can be used by Implementation Teams during any Implementation Stage to rate implementation supports currently in place.
This planning tool, including examples, provides the opportunity for Implementation Teams to have in-depth discussions about each Driver toward action planning. Completing this process is important for moving from the Exploration Stage to the Installation Stage.
An action plan is simply a way of guiding the implementation team’s discussion and identification of the next right steps in implementing your program, then holding yourselves accountable for accomplishing those activities within a specified timeline.
These tools can be used to plan and guide your team’s review of past and current programs to get a clear picture of successful strategies, and challenges, along with existing mandates and resource commitments.
This planning tool will help you identify the core components (essential functions) of your evidence based program, as well as expected, developmental and unacceptable practice variations.
All implementation stage-based assessments are now merged into one tool. This planning tool provides an implementation team the opportunity to assess, plan and track stage-based activities and improve the success of implementation efforts EBPs/EIIs across stages.
The primary purpose of the State Capacity Assessment (SCA) is to assist state agency, regional education agencies, and school districts implement effective innovations that benefit students. (v25.3)
This planning tool assists Implementation Teams in exploring Implementation Drivers (competency, organizational and leadership), including Driver functions and accountability, as well as how each can be improved to better support implementation.
The Hexagon Tool can help states, districts, and schools appropriately select EBPs/EIIs by reviewing six broad factors in relation to the program or practice under consideration.
This document provides an overview and templates for Terms of Reference and Communication Protocols.
The Training Plan Template is designed to help guide your team’s planning process in developing a training program. This tool can be used to guide discussions around rationale, core components, knowledge, skills, outcomes and assessment.

Handouts

This guide has been developed to lead and link users directly to The Active Implementation Hub’s online learning environment and tools for use by any stakeholder involved in active implementation and scaling up of programs and innovations.
Implementation Teams employ Active Implementation Frameworks in their work. Here are the five frameworks and descriptions.
Practice profiles enable a program to be teachable, learnable, and doable in typical human service settings. This document can help to guide your team’s creation of Practice Profiles for your program.
The SMT works with purveyors and intermediaries to develop knowledge and skills related to increasing implementation and scaling-up capacity. They work closely with other teams to promote alignment of systems as EBP/EII scaling-up decisions emerge.
The purpose of the State Design Team (SDT) is to bring the initiatives together to work on the one thing they all have in common – the plans for each initiative need to be executed (implemented) if they are to be effective and sustainable and add to education success.
RITs develop the capacity in Districts to make full use of one or more EBP and/or EII with 60% or more of the schools/students in the region. RITs also are a conduit for information that needs to flow back to the SMT and SDT.
The key function of the members of the DIT is to ensure that implementation capacity is developed at the school level in all schools, and that collectively the schools and District build the infrastructure needed for high fidelity implementation.
The BIT plays a critical role in ensuring teachers have the confidence and competence to use EBPs/EIIs with fidelity. They work closely with the District Implementation Team (DIT) to ensure teachers are supported and students are achieving intended outcomes.
Communication is important for any program/innovation. Developing and linking communication protocols for new or existing programs establishes a transparent feedback process and furthers the development of a hospitable policy, funding, and operational environment.
Are there barriers and/or facilitators in our current system that may be related to EBP implementation? What are the next right steps? Use this handout to help identify issues that may be facilitating or hindering implementation.
A Usable Innovation needs to be teachable, learnable, doable, and readily assessed in practice if it is to be used effectively to reach all students who could benefit.
Implementation Teams support the full, effective, and sustained use of effective instruction and behavior methods. Linked Implementation Teams define an infrastructure to help assure dramatically and consistently improved student outcomes.
Implementation Drivers are the key components of capacity that enable the success of innovations in practice. Implementation Drivers assure development of relevant competencies, necessary organization supports, and engaged leadership.
Implementation Stages outline the integrated, non‐linear process of deciding to use an effective innovation and having it fully in place to realize outcomes. Active implementation stages are Exploration, Installation, Initial Implementation and Full Implementation.
Implementation Teams employ improvement cycles in order to intentionally identify problems and solutions. Underlying the different types of improvement cycles described in this active implementation framework is the Plan, Do, Study, Act Cycle or PDSA Cycle.
This checklist should be completed quarterly by the Implementation Team to monitor the development and use of core implementation components.
The SSIP Implementation Teams completes this checklist quarterly to monitor the development and use of core implementation components in the development of the State Systemic Improvement Plan.
Building up your implementation capacity takes intentional and integrated planning. This handout assists you in thinking through a mutual selection process and includes implementation-specific factors to look for during staff selection.
We encourage you and your team to use this Independent Learning Plan as a guide to learning about and applying the information on this Active Implementation Hub web site.
In this example of a fidelity assessment, items are designed to detect the presence and strength of each PBIS core feature in a school environment. Data source may be a product, interview, or observation. These ways of assessing fidelity are summarized in the handout.
This one-page handout contains questions to guide the District Capacity Assessment debriefing process and discussion.
This one-page handout contains a 17 step protocol for administering the District Capacity Assessment.
A one-page overview of the District Capacity Assessment.
A one-page overview of the technology requirements for the District Capacity Assessment.
This handout contains a list of data sources than be gathered prior to DCA administration to inform scoring.
This set of questions can be used to prompt discussion of the District Capacity Assessment results with the District Implementation Team and leadership.
A one-page action plan template for planning actions to follow the administration of the District Capacity Assessment.
This one-pager provides a quick review of Implementation Drivers, as well an overview of the Selection Driver... including best practices and interview tips.
A Decision Support Data System (DSDS) is a system for identifying, collecting, and analyzing data that are useful to the staff and leadership of the implementing agencies. The data system needs to provide timely, accurate, and reliable data for decision-making.

Lessons

Coaching is regular, embedded professional development designed to help staff use a new program or practice. In this short lesson we’ll provide an overview of Coaching, and then give you an opportunity to apply the concepts presented.
A Decision Support Data System (DSDS) is a system for identifying, collecting, and analyzing data that are useful to the staff and leadership of the implementing agencies. The data system needs to provide timely, accurate, and reliable data for decision-making.
The Fidelity Driver is key to effective implementation. In this lesson you will learn how to inventory your system for existing fidelity data & begin using fidelity data as a system diagnostic tool.
Selection refers to the purposeful process of recruiting, interviewing, and hiring ‘with the end in mind’. This lesson will introduce you to the Selection Driver, review best practices for Selection, and provide an opportunity to apply these concepts.
This 5-minute presentation provides a quick overview of Implementation Science and the National Implementation Research Network's Active Implementation Frameworks.
The Hexagon Tool helps states, districts, and schools systematically evaluate new and existing interventions via six broad factors: needs, fit, resource availability, evidence, readiness for replication and capacity to implement.
After this lesson you will be able to identify criteria that distinguish a usable intervention as well as select and employ appropriate tools and processes for assessing the fit of an intervention.
Practice profiles enable a program to be teachable, learnable, and doable in typical human service settings.
This lesson provides a quick overview of the Training Plan Template, a planning tool designed to help guide your Team’s planning process in developing a training program.
This lesson provides a quick overview of the Coaching System Development Worksheet along with research and rationales supporting the use of coaching to build your implementation capacity.
This online lesson describes the key components in each PDSA Cycle phase and identifies why and when PDSA Cycles are used for rapid cycle problem solving in active implementation.
This online lesson describes the key functions of the Stages of Implementation Analysis planning tool and high level activities related to the stages of implementation
Coaching not only expands the knowledge and skills taught in training, but also builds competence and confidence in delivering the innovation.
To be effective, useful to the work of the organization and include all appropriate levels, communication must be strategically planned and consciously monitored. This lesson introduces you to a tool for creating a strategic plan for communication in your organization.

Readings

The purpose of this Brief is to provide a framework that state leadership teams and others can use to develop the capacity to make effective, statewide, and sustained use of evidence-based practices and other innovations.
Technical Assistance (TA) is designed to build the capacity of individuals and organizations to achieve desired outcomes. When the scale or depth of change is more extensive, Basic TA efforts need to be supplemented with more Intensive Technical Assistance.
The purpose of this Brief is to define the variables a state or district leadership team may wish to consider as they determine if they are “ready” to invest in the scaling‐up of an innovation in education.
Exploration Stage processes are designed to assure mutually informed agreement to proceed with use of an innovation; both the Implementation Team and the organization understand what is to be done, how it will be done, and the resources and timelines for doing it.
Education systems and the units within those systems are highly variable. An implementation infrastructure in the form of Implementation Teams can be developed to account for the variability.
How can a State Education Agency (SEA) actively promote and support organizational and systems change? The answer may lie in a logic model informed by implementation science and characterized by multi‐level supports that interact.

Video Vignettes

Case Example: Reflection and Application of Implementation Drivers in Minnesota - Vicky Weinberg, Minnesota Department of Education
Karen Blase from the National Implementation Science Network (NIRN) explains Staff Selection as an Implementation Driver.
Karen Blase from the National Implementation Science Network (NIRN) explains Implementation Drivers and what to do if you already have staff in place.
This 5-minute presentation provides a quick overview of Implementation Science and NIRN's Active Implementation Frameworks.
An interview with Melissa Van Dyke about creating readiness for change.
How can we take these good ideas that work in some places, and get them to work in all places so all children in all schools would have access? Listen to Dean Fixsen and Karen Blase from (NIRN) discuss active implementation and scaling up. [running time 4 min. 50 sec.]
Karen Blase from the National Implementation Research Network (NIRN) introduces you to the Active Implementation Hub website.
Karen Blase from the National Implementation Research Network (NIRN) discusses the importance of Implementation Science for education.
Dean Fixsen from the National Implementation Science Network (NIRN) talks about the role leadership plays in implementing innovations.
In this video clip, Dean Fixsen talks briefly about the relationship of implementation science to innovation science, improvement science and complexity theory. (2 min. 22 sec.)
In this clip, Dean Fixsen introduces the Implementation Drivers and talks about their importance in assuring fidelity and outcomes. (1 min. 53 sec.)
In this video clip, Dean Fixsen uses NAEP student data to illustrate how outcome measures can remain constant for decades regardless of dollar investment. (7 min. 34 sec.)
In this video clip, Dean Fixsen offers an applied definition of implementation science in the human services field. (2 min. 28 sec.)
In this clip, Dean Fixsen outlines a formula for success for achieving socially significant outcomes. (1 min. 2 sec.)
Video clips from Oregon and Tigard Tualatin School District discussing implementation science and scaling-up concepts. (filmed in 2008)
Video clips from Oregon and Tigard Tualatin School District discussing implementation science and scaling-up concepts. (filmed in 2008)
Video clips from Oregon and Tigard Tualatin School District discussing implementation science and scaling-up concepts. (filmed in 2008)
Video clips from Oregon and Tigard Tualatin School District discussing implementation science and scaling-up concepts. (filmed in 2009)